Nemtsov: Putin drops ‘Novorossiya’ project; not a single objective achieved

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2014/10/12 • Analysis & Opinion

Russian oppositionist politician Boris Nemtsov wrote on his FB page that Putin has closed the ‘Novorossiya’ project; none of the objectives laid out by President Vladimir Putin were achieved.

“Putin ordered 17,600 troops to return to their places of permanent deployment. Now we can take time out and draw some conclusions. They are terrible.” he said.

“Putin wanted to tie Ukraine to Russia, to encourage its entry into the Customs Union. He got the exact opposite … He wanted Ukraine to maintain a neutral status. He failed miserably… He wanted to win the respect of the Ukrainian people. He created a long-lasting enemy and received Putin- [email protected] as a gift in return.” stated Nemtsov.

“Putin wanted a ‘Novorossiya’, stretching from Donetsk to Odesa. He got a small section of the Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts… he wanted a corridor to the Crimea via Mariupol. He raised awareness and resistance among the locals, and spurred Russians residents in Mariupol to dig trenches around the city… He wanted to seize land without firing a single shot, like in Crimea. He got 4,000 people killed on both sides.” said the politician.

Nemtsov maintains that Russia’s economy has “plummeted due to capital leaving the country – over $ 100 billion, exchange at 40 rubles for one dollar (depreciation of 20%), double-digit inflation for food products and total economic stagnation with no investments and innovations.”

“Putin wanted to be recognized as a strong leader in world politics. He became an outcast…. Soon Russians will realize that prices have risen, but not their salaries or profits. It won’t be possible for him to blame Obama any longer.” concluded Nemtsov.

Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered the Defense Ministry to transfer Russian troops (about 17,000 soldiers), which were conducting military exercises in Rostov oblast (Russia), to their places of permanent deployment.

Translated by: Christine Chraibi
Source: Ukrayinska Pravda

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  • Donald Casavant

    A glimmer of hope? If this is true, the hell with the cease fire! Ukraine should press onward to secure territory currently occupied by the terrorist. After they accomplish expulsion of terrorist from mainland Ukraine then move onward to free the Crimea!
    But this is but a dream! I hope what is written in this posting is true, but I will hold my dreams until these items are verified, but I will not hold my breath awaiting the verification!

    • disqus60

      I think the best way to win back land is to win the war thru prosperity for its people and begin to realize the dreams of those who began the revolution for independence and justice. When Ukraine becomes prosperous and realizes its potential and offers hope for those who are hopeless, it will win the hearts and minds of those who didn’t believe before. Then it will be Ukraines time to allow or not, those it wants to be part of its prosperity.

      • Donald Casavant

        I agree that it is possible…However I think that it will take years to happen and the “other side” is not going to sit on their hands while free and independent Ukraine progresses.

  • Murf

    I differ with the author on one point. He REALLY wanted crimea and for all due purposes he has got it.
    Of course now it’s an expensive mill stone around his neck. Wastfulle both politically and economically and nearly undefendable military.
    For both countries there will be before and after.
    Ukraine for the first has become a nation.
    Russia and Putin has been broken.

    • Karl Øystein Karlstad

      He just gave him self a “political suicide” Putin will never be “big” in international politics from now on.

      • Murf

        Before all this began Putin was looking pretty good. the international community was willing to over look what sociopathic murder he was because he at least got Russia moving again. After he bailed out Obama on his “red line ” in syria he looked almost statesmen like.
        But trash always floats to the surface.
        You can dress him in an Armani suit but in the end he will always be that kid chasing rats in his tenement in St Pete’s

    • Rascalndear

      yes, but Crimea comes with major natural gas reserves in the Black Sea which may have been the real objective here. And those reserves are lost to Ukraine unless it can get an international ruling for Russia either to get out of them or to compensate Ukraine for them… lots of luck there…

  • Brent

    Hopefully the Russian troops still in Ukraine are also being recalled.

    There was a lot of chatter this week out of the U.S. of ‘easing sanctions’ against Russia if they started to abide by the Minsk accord. The withdrawal of troops from Rostov region is not enough for that to happen. The Donbass is a devastated region in control of terrorists sponsored by Russia. More needs to be done before any ‘offramps’ are given or sanctions are removed

    • Jari Hämäläinen

      And let’s not forget the situation in Moldova and Georgia either. Russian so called peacekeepers are still keeping up frozen conflicts in those areas also. They should be forced to retreat so the govs in Tbilisi and Chisnau can regain control over the full area of them.

  • steve34609

    Years from now the sanctions will still be in place,the price of Urals oil will have plummeted, nat gas sales to the EU will have been halved and the Russian economy will be much smaller than it is now. Neither Kyiv nor the west will budge on the illegal annexation of Crimea. It will have become a ‘frozen conflict zone’ with Russia illegally occupying Ukraine. NATO will have built more bases on the perimeter of the Russian federation and will be much more prepared to mount a defensive strike in the event of a Russian troop movement into NATO territory. Ukraine will be closer to membership in both the EU and NATO. So be it! Russia’s xenophobia, nationalism and paranoia have driven this destructive foreign policy.

    • Rascalndear

      For Ukraine, it has not been a destructive policy but a constructive policy, removing the soviet, imperialist veil from Ukrainians’ eyes regarding Russia.

  • Jacks Channel

    After this is all over, and Putin comes to his senses, we should restore full trade with Russia and put all of this behind us where possible.

    The will of the people dictates their Presidents actions, not the other way around. If enough people don’t like a government policy, it can be changed. Its the right of the people.

    • Lilianna Juhasz

      “the will of the people dictates their presidents actions’? Have you been paying attention to what is happening in Russia? The will of the people only works in a country that is not run by self declared leaders who have megalomaniac tendencies and ‘loyal’ armies and a population that has not been subjected to mind numbing propaganda. In Russia, those who disagree with the leadership end up dead, in prison or permanently silenced through intimidation.

    • Mykola Potytorsky

      Putin has no senses to come back to

      • Olya

        Am holding my breath that this is true. But. proof is in the pudding.

  • Rods

    I think we all know if you are a violent bully, then you will be revered by those hangers on while they are profiting from you, tolerated by those that are afraid and put in you place by those that are not scared. Well done to the brave, under-equipped, Ukrainian troops for putting Putin in his place.

    If Putin knew his history better he would of known about the fighting prowess of the Cossacks of the Don basin, which were always the Tsars’ Calvary of choice in the 17th and 18th centuries.

    The route Putin is currently taking all but condemns him to a short third presidency, either by a coup at the top or by a popular uprising through poverty and/or hunger. In 1917 the Bolshevik revolution started in St Petersburg due to a lack of bread, the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1989-1991 due to empty shops and his current self inflicted food shortages and tanking oil price dependent economy may well have the same result before 2018.

    When that happens, the current peripheral oblasts that want independence, like Chechnya, Siberia and those in the Volga basin will no longer be part of Russia and Ukraine, Georgia and Moldova will get back the territory taken by Russia.

    Where he has gone the nationalist route, he may well try to keep his popularity through further foreign ‘adventures’ in Ukraine, Moldova, Georgia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and several ‘-stan’ countries, but as we have seen from Ukraine, success is far from certain and far from rebuilding an empire he may well be accelerating its further demise.

    The west needs to keep the pressure on Putin’s regime by keeping many of the sanctions in place, developing alternative sources to Russian oil and gas, so they are one of a number of suppliers that all have to compete on price. This will be good for EU industry and consumers. The pressure of sanctions should only be reduced further by Russia withdrawing from Ukraine, including Crimea, paying war reparations and giving the west guarantees that there will be no more overseas adventures.

  • disqus60

    If its true, it will be a step in stability, but Putin, nor the Russian government has been a bastion of truth since Ukraine became a point of interest. Time will tell. Keep sanctions in place and make it thru the winter to see what happens in the East. For now he is still supplying weapons and fighters to Eastern Ukraine. Ukrainians should embrace their future and begin to plan for prosperity. It will come.

  • Paul Leck

    putin has said this before remember? there is little truth to it

  • jmundstuk

    “opportunist politician?” This is reporting or polemic?

    • Rascalndear

      Try reading again. It says “oppositionist politician.” Duh Maybe not the best English (should be “opposition politician”) but it’s definitely not “opportunist.”

  • Paul P. Valtos

    Until this devil is ousted there is no glimmer of hope. Hopefully the Brighton Beach group will do him in. Churchill knew not to trust Stalin, so did Gomulka. Stupid Benes thought that Slavs should stick together but they stuck it to him. Masaryk saw where everything was going so they threw him out a window. How anyone could be so naïve that someone formerly from the KGB could ever be trusted to tell the truth. They are good at sleiht of hand, doing one thing but having another goal in mind. Those shot in Katyn forest were to believe that they were going for interrogation not a bullet in the back of the head. Never trust a snake.

  • rooscow

    It took two decades for the Russian Federation to prove to the free world that they wanted to play nice in the world economy. It took Putin less than a year to demonstrate his ability to urinate on and exploit the trust he was extended through terrorist threats. Do not forget that it was very recently that he admonished the world that the Russian Federation is a nuclear power not to be trifled with. That trust should return only at great cost, accompanied with his withdrawal/removal from any position of power now or in any future. He should not be let up easy.

  • Rascalndear

    Let’s hope even a part of this is true, but I think Putin won’t give up on this project until he is dead and gone. By their very nature, maniacs don’t listen to reason. And ego-maniacs don’t listen to anyone.