March against Russia’s war in Ukraine goes global on Peace Day, September 21, 2014

map2

 

2014/09/26 • Political News

Article by: Alya Shandra

On September 21, 2014, International Peace Day, marches for peace were traditionally held all over the world. This global wave of marches grew in support for the Moscow march for Peace. 59 of them in 27 countries were held against Russian aggression in Ukraine, as registered on the Global FB event. Many more spontaneous protests were held. Russia has been vehemently denying its participation in the ongoing conflict of the Eastern Ukrainian region of Donbas, but overwhelming evidence of the presence of regular Russian troops in Ukraine, such information on Russian soldiers KIA in Ukraine gathered by the “Cargo-200” FB group, has is turning the tide of Russian sentiment to speak out against the war in Ukraine, which is why in eight Russian cities organized marches were held. Click on the point on the map to get more info on the event. The full list of marches is here.

Marches held in Russia were in the spotlight of media attention. The most numerous one was in Moscow, with 20 to 30 thousand participants counted by the opposition yet only 5 thousand – by government officials. The rally in St.Petersburg, despite attempts of the authorities to disband the protest, gathered several thousand participants too. Other protest locations included Voronezh, Volgograd, Perm, Yekaterinburg, Novosibirsk, Krasnoyarsk.

Panorama shot of the Peace March in Moscow on September 21

Panorama shot of the Peace March in Moscow on September 21

During the march, ordinary Russians spoke out against Putin and Russia’s involvement in the war, asking Ukraine for forgiveness and saying that they have had enough of Putin’s lies.

  • Moscow: "Putin, I am tired of your lies" - @Fake_MIDRF
    Moscow: "Putin, I am tired of your lies" - @Fake_MIDRF
  • Moscow: "Hands off Ukraine"
    Moscow: "Hands off Ukraine"
  • Moscow: "Putin, enough lying and making war"
    Moscow: "Putin, enough lying and making war"
  • Moscow: "Forgive us, Ukraine"
    Moscow: "Forgive us, Ukraine"
  • St.Petersburg teachers: "I don't want to lie to my students" @ProtestSPb
    St.Petersburg teachers: "I don't want to lie to my students" @ProtestSPb
  • Krasnoyarsk: "Ukraine is already without Yanukovych; Russia will be without Putin"
    Krasnoyarsk: "Ukraine is already without Yanukovych; Russia will be without Putin"
  • Moscow: "Why die, kill, go to war in Ukraine? Let's build in Russia!" @AndreyGrammar
    Moscow: "Why die, kill, go to war in Ukraine? Let's build in Russia!" @AndreyGrammar
  • St.Petersburg: "Better be active today than radioactive tomorrow" -hints at #Lavrov's threats @ProtestSPb
    St.Petersburg: "Better be active today than radioactive tomorrow" -hints at #Lavrov's threats @ProtestSPb
  • St.Petersburg: "Putin, hands off independent state Ukraine!" @ProtestSPb
    St.Petersburg: "Putin, hands off independent state Ukraine!" @ProtestSPb
  • Moscow: "Putin needs slaves and enemies, not Russia; roots of war: lies,fear, indifference" @_openrussia
    Moscow: "Putin needs slaves and enemies, not Russia; roots of war: lies,fear, indifference" @_openrussia
  • Perm: "Stop the Moscow Cain"
    Perm: "Stop the Moscow Cain"
  • Volgograd: "We demand to stop aggressive politics"
    Volgograd: "We demand to stop aggressive politics"
  • Kalinigrad. "Russians and Ukrainians are brothers"
    Kalinigrad. "Russians and Ukrainians are brothers"
  • map2
    map2

The marches in other cities around the world were smaller, but still numbering up to 1000 participants (Rome). Germany and USA both saw 7 cities taking part in the global event. New Zealand and Sydney joined in from the Southern Hemisphere.

Gallery 1

  • Kharkiv
    Kharkiv
  • Washington DC
    Washington DC
  • Vienna
    Vienna
  • Vancouver
    Vancouver
  • Istanbul
    Istanbul
  • Tel Aviv
    Tel Aviv
  • Stockholm
    Stockholm
  • Stockholm
    Stockholm
  • Seattle
    Seattle
  • San Francisco
    San Francisco
  • Rome
    Rome
  • Paris
    Paris
  • Odesa
    Odesa
  • New York
    New York
  • Nuremberg
    Nuremberg
  • Honolulu
    Honolulu

Gallery 2

  • Oslo
    Oslo
  • Auckland
    Auckland
  • Munich
    Munich
  • Milan
    Milan
  • Madrid
    Madrid
  • Los Angeles
    Los Angeles
  • London
    London
  • Leipzig
    Leipzig
  • Houston
    Houston
  • Helsinki
    Helsinki

Gallery 3

  • Hamburg
    Hamburg
  • Gothenberg
    Gothenberg
  • Tbilisi
    Tbilisi
  • Frankfurt
    Frankfurt
  • Tallinn
    Tallinn
  • Dublin
    Dublin
  • Limasol
    Limasol
  • Cologne
    Cologne
  • Burgas
    Burgas
  • Boston
    Boston
  • Berlin
    Berlin
  • Basel
    Basel
  • Athens
    Athens
  • Lisboa
    Lisboa
  • Haifa
    Haifa

The East Ukrainian cities of Lysychansk, Kharkiv. and Sloviansk also joined in the march. Odesa in South Ukraine was also not left aside. A special feature of the marches around the world was the participation not only of nationalities that suffered from Russian aggression, such as Georgia, Poland, the Baltic states, but also of Russians around the world that joined Ukrainian communities in demonstrating against Russia’s overt war in Ukraine and it’s occupation. Prior to the march, a series of protests flooded Russia. A new stage of the anti-war movement in Russia began with the formation of the Russian Anti-War committee, which appealed to citizens to prevent their children from leaving to fight to Ukraine, often to their death. Russians both in and outside of Russia are showing that there is another Russia, and stakes are high. As one anecdote aptly put it, “that awkward moment when you realize that the only way to help Ukraine is to start a Maidan in Russia.”

In support of the march, a music video in support of 21 September 2014 was made to a song by Christian Tessen. Photos of refugees from war zone taken by Kira Dzhafarova at “Station Kharkov” volunteer center in Kharkiv, Ukraine.

 

Tags: , ,

  • Paul P. Valtos

    It seems insane that any Russian who lived under Stalin or his successors until Gorbachov would want to stay in Russia or want to leave Ukraine. At least in Ukraine you can get a fresh start and maybe being under EU sponsorship they can get rid of that goofy centralized control of the economy and clean out the crooks in government.

    • Dean Venture

      It’s surprising how short people’s memories are! 25 years ago, people couldn’t wait to get rid of communism. Now some are nostalgic about Stalin.